Energy Academy
An international centre of excellence and a gateway to Heriot-Watt's energy research and training activities

Hydrogen Student Design Contest - Design a Power-to-Gas System

 

Hydrogen Student Design Contest: Designing a Power-to-Gas System

This Hydrogen Student Contest to Design a Power-to-Gas System might be of interest to under-graduate and graduate students wherever you work. 

The Hydrogen Student Design Contest challenges multi-disciplinary teams of university students to apply their creativity and academic skills in the areas of design, engineering, economics, environmental science, business and marketing to the hydrogen and fuel cell industries. The Contest is open to undergraduate and graduate students worldwide. Multiple teams from one institution are permitted. Link: http://www.hydrogencontest.org/theme.asp

The theme of the 2017-2018 Hydrogen Student Design Contest is “Designing a Power-to-Gas System.”

The 2017 Hydrogen Student Design Contest will challenge student teams from around the world to develop a design for a system that uses electricity to produce hydrogen for cross market uses, including energy storage, ancillary services, and transportation fuel. The teams will choose a site in their area, engage their local electric and gas utility, coordinate with regulatory bodies and safety experts, and create educational materials, including a short video.

For detailed Rules & Guidelines, see the Contest Rules page: http://www.hydrogencontest.org/rules.asp

The deadline for team registration is 15th September 2017, with final project submission by 31st January 2018. Register at www.hydrogencontest.org/register.asp

The Hydrogen Student Design Contest is open to undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students worldwide. Multiple teams from one institution are permitted, but students may not belong to more than one team, and teams must work independently.

Hydrogen Student Design 2017 Contest Information

Registration: Register your team via the Hydrogen Energy Foundation (HEF) Contest website at www.hydrogencontest.org/register.asp by September 15, 2017. You will be asked to provide the name of your Institution, your name and email, and your faculty advisor’s name and email address.


Eligibility: The Contest is open to undergraduate and graduate students worldwide. All team members must have been enrolled in a college or university by September 1, 2017 but do not have to be enrolled full-time.

Introduction: Each year, the Hydrogen Education Foundation’s Hydrogen Student Design Contest (“the Contest”) challenges teams of university-level students from around the world to develop and design hydrogen applications for real-world use.
Established in 2004 by the Hydrogen Education Foundation, the Contest showcases the talents of students in many disciplines, including engineering, architecture, urban planning, marketing, and entrepreneurship. Undergraduate and graduate students worldwide are eligible to participate.

The Challenge: The 2017 Hydrogen Student Design Contest will challenge student teams from around the world to develop a design for a system that uses electricity to produce hydrogen for cross market uses, including energy storage, ancillary services, and transportation fuel. The teams will choose a site in their area, engage their local electric and gas utility, coordinate with regulatory bodies and safety experts, and create educational materials, including a short video.

Some Important Dates
1 September 2017           Webinar on Topic, Resources
15 September 2017         Registration Deadline
15 October 2017               Project Outline (Abstract and Approach) Due
1 November 2017            Webinar on Progress, Feedback
31 January 2018                Final Project Submission Deadline

Background to the 2017-2018 Hydrogen Student Design Contest

In a global effort to reduce carbon emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels, which are causing anthropogenic climate change, many countries around the globe have committed to renewable energy and zero emission technologies. This is causing a transition of the energy sector from centralized to a more decentralized form of production, leading to significant challenges along the way. The challenges on the electricity side include overproduction of renewable energy during peak times, resulting in curtailment and loss of resources, strains on the transmission grid during times of high production, intermittency issues with the need for energy storage or reserve generation, etc. Furthermore, many stakeholders in the transportation sector are preparing for adoption of near-zero or zero emission transportation solutions, not only for passenger vehicles, but also the entire goods movement sector, to reduce or eliminate local health hazards from criteria pollutants like particulate matter, SOx and NOx. Finally, governments are also creating global ozone and greenhouse gas reduction goals.
While there is no solution that can address all of these challenges, power-to-gas (P2G) can address a number of these issues, and deserves to be evaluated closely. Power-to-gas systems use excess renewable power to produce hydrogen from water through electrolysis. The hydrogen can then be transported through the natural gas grid via direct blending or further conversion to methane from waste carbon streams. The hydrogen could also be transported by other means, such as trucks, or used directly at the point of production. The stored chemical energy can then be used to generate electricity via a fuel cell or other generation device, as a transportation fuel, for space and water heating in residential and commercial building, to provide heat for industrial processes, and any other purpose for which hydrogen or methane is currently used.
Unlike batteries that will require massive capital investments and can only provide storage for a few hours, P2G has the potential to leverage the installed natural gas pipeline system to provide energy storage for days, weeks, or months, shifting energy from season to season as needed. As the world transitions more toward renewable power sources like wind and solar, the ability to store large amounts of excess power for extended time periods will be critical to supporting a renewable power grid.

 

RT @PaulFox13: #SolarEclipse view form Valrico at 1:55 pm. Maximum sun blockage at 2:49 pm. #Florida Credit: Ronald Kotinsky https://t.co/s…
RT @Pundamentalism: Couldn't they just switch Big Ben to vibrate?
Must be @Oriamscotland ? https://t.co/1plPVEUNy9